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Jesse Eisenberg

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Jesse E

SHELF LIFE:Recommends four contemporary plays

by Jesse Eisenberg

2019/11/23


"I suppose it’s impossible for me to divorce my interpretation of plays from my background as an actor,” says Jesse Eisenberg, the Academy Award nominee best known for his 2010 role as Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network. Eisenberg has also written four plays...

by Jesse Eisenberg

2019/11/23



"I suppose it’s impossible for me to divorce my interpretation of plays from my background as an actor,” says Jesse Eisenberg, the Academy Award nominee best known for his 2010 role as Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network. Eisenberg has also written four plays, three of which he starred in; his latest, Happy Talk, starring Susan Sarandon, opened in New York this past spring and will be published next month by Grove Press. Here, his picks of plays worth reading.

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, by Edward Albee

During a play, the audience is stuck in the room with a person onstage, feet in front of them. And because of this stark proximity, the audience is forced to contend with this behavior and see it through to its end point, even when it’s a struggle. This is what initially excited me during the New Jersey community theater production of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?that I saw when I was 15. It was thrilling to be in the room, a voyeur of people fighting with each other. It was so engaging that I was almost disappointed by the brilliant revelation of the non-existent son. I would have been completely satisfied by watching the painful interaction between this vengeful couple without an underlying reason for their distress.

Scarcity, by Lucy Thurber

I began writing plays when I was 20 years old and was primarily inspired by two plays written by friends of mine. This is the first, and it tells the story of a working-class family in western Massachusetts who are visited by a yuppie, bleeding-heart teacher from New York City. It is a funny, authentic, and harsh indictment of cosmopolitan condescension. What thrilled me about this play, besides its wonderful characters and rumbling personality, was that it was primarily playing to an audience who would identify with the antagonist. This tension—between the play’s main theme and the people watching it—made me rethink the stories that I could write and the way I could explore my own flaws onstage.

How to Make Friends and then Kill Them, by Halley Feiffer

The other play written by a friend that inspired me is How to Make Friends and then Kill Them. It’s a hysterical absurdist comedy about three women who torment each other throughout their lives. It is shocking but always emotional, as though it was written by a very funny person, but from their gut rather than their head.

Lady, by Craig Wright

Finally, Lady, written by one of my favorite writers, taught me about dramatic efficiency and the way comedy can be used without undermining drama. The play is a compact, well-worn story about a withering friendship, but the real trick is that each character serves a thematic purpose while still seeming genuine and complicated. It taught me that you can write about politics as long as there are real people at the center.


SOURCE

Jesse E

My Two-Year-Old Requests Just One More Song Before Bed

By Jesse Eisenberg

2019/11/21


me: O.K., honey, it’s time to go to sleep.

my son: Just one more song.

me: No, we’re done with songs for the night.

my son: Just one more!

me: Fine. We’ll do one more song.

my son: Two more.

me: You just...

My Two-Year-Old Requests Just One More Song Before Bed

By Jesse Eisenberg

2019/11/21



me: O.K., honey, it’s time to go to sleep.

my son: Just one more song.

me: No, we’re done with songs for the night.

my son: Just one more!

me: Fine. We’ll do one more song.

my son: Two more.

me: You just said one.

my son: Now I say two.

me: O.K., we’ll do two quiet songs.

my son: Two loud songs.

me: We’re not doing two loud songs before sleep.

my son: One loud, one quiet.

me: O.K., fine, Jesus, we’ll do one loud song and one quiet song.

my son: And for one that’s loud—also must be fast and have rhythm section.

me: What? No! That’s just going to rile you up.

my son: Not rile up! Two simple E.D.M. tracks and then go to sleep!

me: What the hell is E.D.M.?

my son: Electronic dance music. From rave culture.

me: Rave culture? You’re two years old!

my son: Or maybe samba. Like at Nova Noche.

me: What’s Nova Noche?

my son: Club in Latin Quarter.

me: There’s a Latin Quarter in New York?

my son: Mostly underground scene. Maybe we go there now?

me: No! We’re not going to the Latin Quarter!

my son: Go for quick drink.

me: Absolutely not!

my son: Just one drink at Nova Noche! I ask them mix it weak for you.

me: Stop it. I’m not going to be bullied by you.

my son: Yes! Daddy bullied by me, just like Daddy bullied by boss at work and most men Daddy come into contact with. Daddy has face that inspire bullying for some reason. Something about mouth-and-nose combination.

me: Hey, show some respect! I am thirty-two years older than you. You only exist because of a decision I made with Mommy.

my son: Mommy drunk at the time.

me: What?

my son: Mommy said only reason you still together is because half bottle of Jim Beam and bad patterns with men stemming from unresolved issues with Grandpa Steve.

me: When did she tell you that?

my son: At Nova Noche.

me: You went to the club with Mommy?

my son: Yes, Mommy like dancing. Mommy good dance partner.

me: Wait—you know how to dance?

my son: Dancing not thing you “know.” Dancing thing you “feel.” This why you never be good at dancing. You not in touch with emotion.

me: That’s not fair! Mommy and I used to dance all the time.

my son: Mommy say was always excruciating for her. Mommy say watching you dance with stupid grin on your face extra embarrassing because shows complete lack of self-awareness. Mommy say that watching you dance is like watching raccoon stuck in bear trap. Funny analogy. Funny visual. Mommy funny!

me: That’s it! I’ve had enough.

my son: I just beginning!

me: We are listening to “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” one time and then you’re going to sleep.

my son: If Daddy play “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star” even one time, I tell Mommy that, at night, Daddy look at Instagram account of ex-girlfriend.

me: What? How’d you know about that?

my son: I sleep with one eye open.

me: That’s terrifying.

my son: So, here is deal. First, we listen to Skull and Crossbones—is hardcore death-metal band. Then we listen to mixtape of Lil Rizza, new rapper out of Oakland, album drop next month but I get early cut from friend of friend of Rizza. Then we listen to full “White Album,” then “Black Album” from Jay-Z, and then “Grey Album,” mashup from Danger Mouse. Then we have discussion about fair use and copyright law as applies to intellectual property, using “Grey Album” as case study. Then go to sleep.

me: O.K., fine. As long as you promise to go to sleep after all that.

my son: Yes, but first want milk.

me: O.K., I’ll go get you a cup of milk.

my son: Chocolate milk.


SOURCE


Jesse E

191119-Jesse Eisenberg attends Child Mind Institute Advocacy Dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street on November 19, 2019 in New York City.

191119-Jesse Eisenberg attends Child Mind Institute Advocacy Dinner at Cipriani 42nd Street on November 19, 2019 in New York City.

Jesse E

191118-19th Annual 24 Hour Plays Broadway Gala

191118-19th Annual 24 Hour Plays Broadway Gala

Jesse E

191118-Jesse Eisenberg is seen on November 18, 2019 in New York City.

191118-Jesse Eisenberg is seen on November 18, 2019 in New York City.

Jesse E
191111-Milwauke...

191111-Milwaukee Bucks v Oklahoma City Thunder

191111-Milwaukee Bucks v Oklahoma City Thunder

Jesse E

The treble: Jesse Eisenberg, from screen to stage

The man who played Mark Zuckerberg tells Geoffrey Macnab about working with Woody (and Richard Ayoade, and Kelly Reichardt), farmyard bladder control and how to act stoned.

Geoffrey Macnab
Updated: 7 August 2017


Jesse Eisenberg in Richard Ayoade's The Double

Jesse Eisenberg was nominated...

The man who played Mark Zuckerberg tells Geoffrey Macnab about working with Woody (and Richard Ayoade, and Kelly Reichardt), farmyard bladder control and how to act stoned.

Geoffrey Macnab
Updated: 7 August 2017

Jesse Eisenberg in Richard Ayoade's The Double

Jesse Eisenberg was nominated for an Oscar for playing Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg in The Social Network (2010) and has a blossoming career as one of US indie cinema’s favourite male leads. In interview, though, he gives the impression that he is far prouder of the humorous pieces he writes for the New Yorker than of his filmmaking credits.

“I’d been submitting to them [the New Yorker] for years,” he says of the long period he spent accumulating rejection slips from one of America’s most revered publications. Then, finally, the magazine began to accept his work and he became a regular contributor.

“It takes years to break through there,” he sighs. “It’s the only magazine I know that doesn’t have a famous person on the cover. It has some kind of literary integrity that is appealing to me, and a history that is unparalleled.”

Eisenberg had spent a small eternity trying to find his voice as a humorous writer. “I [now] write every day, but it was a long process finding out what I do well. I had a lot of great discouragement when I would write jokes all the time, then was finally told by this comedian Bob Odenkirk that what I was writing was terrible and that [my writing] should be more personal. It changed my life – it’s a moment every creative person has when they realise that what they were doing was exactly wrong for them, and when they find the thing they really excel.”

The actor has two new films premiering at the London Film Festival. In Kelly Reichardt’s Night Moves, he plays Josh Stamos, a sullen environmental activist with a hint of Raskolnikov about him. Josh takes part in an act of eco-terrorism, blowing up a hydroelectric dam, then resorts to further violence and subterfuge to keep ahead of the law. His motives, which initially seemed very idealistic, become increasingly muddied.

Night Moves

“I like that the character didn’t speak, but I also felt concern that he wouldn’t be able to express himself. Then I realised that this is a character who not only doesn’t express himself but buries everything he thinks or feels until there’s just an explosion of violence,” Eisenberg says. “That was the interesting way into the character, thinking about a guy who, every time he has a thought or feeling, instead of expressing himself and relieving himself of the feeling, he buries it inside himself. By the end, he becomes very violent.”

While Night Moves has Dostoevskian elements, Richard Ayoade’s The Double is a Dostoevsky adaptation for real. Loosely adapted from the Russian writer’s 1846 novella, it’s a comedy about a man tormented by his own doppelgänger.

“I thought it was very funny. It takes place in this dystopian world. It’s about this meek businessman in this big bureaucracy, and then his life is overtaken by his doppelgänger. The first character I play, no one likes. The world seems against [him] so much so that when he walks into an elevator, the doors don’t open for him. Then my other character comes in and everybody seems to love this guy for no reason. They look exactly the same, they have exactly the same outfit. It’s a really strange and surreal story. It has this strange, dystopian existential humour, rather than some kind of broad comedic humour like an Adam Sandler two-character thing.”

Eisenberg describes The Double as “the most interesting experience I’ve ever had,” lavishing praise on Ayoade’s visual and comic imagination. The British director had the knack of making even the most banal scene – a character walking down a hall with a little gift in his hand – seem phantasmagoric.

The Double

The New York-born and based Eisenberg made his movie debut as the teenage nephew of the obnoxious seducer played by Campbell Scott in Dylan Kidd’s barbed comedy drama Roger Dodger (2002).

“He [Scott] taught me a lot about film acting. I just got very lucky because I learned from the best,” Eisenberg remembers. “That’s the best training ground.”

Eisenberg is less sure about what he learned in acting classes. At one stage, he studied the works of Uta Hagen (the original Martha in Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?). “The only thing I really remember from her teachings is that if you have to play a character who’s stoned, you have to picture that there’s a balloon inside your head. It really works. I’ve had to do that a few times and I think that’s the best acting lesson I ever got!”

On screen, Eisenberg is equally adept at playing Holden Caulfield-like outsiders, dreamy student types experiencing first love (Adventureland) and darker, more manipulative figures like Zuckerberg.

“I like playing characters who are emotional but I don’t always have the opportunity,” he says. “I like to play characters with an intense emotion because it’s easier to navigate them. It’s difficult for me to play characters that are very casual. I just don’t know what to do, really.”

The actor is dryly sardonic about the research he did for Night Moves.

“I went out early and lived in a yurt that my character lives in and worked on the farm,” he says.

For how long?

“About six years, just really to feel it. My character would have been there for five years but I thought I should just give it one more year, just out of a general sense of dedication.”

Night Moves (2013)

In fact, Eisenberg clarifies, he spent two weeks on the organic farm. “It was interesting because the thing you immediately understand is how slow everything goes,” he notes of his time on the remote farm in the Midwest. “I was coming from New York City, where I ride a bicycle everywhere and everything is immediately accessible. When you live on a yurt and work on a farm, just to get to the bathroom is, like, ten minutes. Everything slows down. You end up only going to pee when you really have to. You make trips that are necessary. As opposed to living in a tiny apartment in New York City, where you’re four feet from your bathroom.”

In playing Josh, Eisenberg learned to “slow down”, taking his tempo from day-to-day life at the farm and behaving in a very deliberate and methodical way. “When I was living on the farm, I realised the reason for my character’s behaviour. When you’re planting the food that you eat, you have a greater appreciation not only for the planting of it but for the eating of it. It just changes your perception of man’s interaction with nature. You start to appreciate nature because you are using it for practical reasons.”

Josh doesn’t just appreciate nature. He is also determined to defend it, “almost sacrificing his life for it.”

It’s little surprise that Eisenberg cites Woody Allen’s Crimes and Misdemeanors as one of his favourite films. He cites with special admiration the scene toward the end of the film when Judah (Martin Landau) and Cliff (Woody Allen) meet by chance. The former is responsible for someone’s murder. “He walks off with a clear conscience while the other character is left stuck in his own prison, but he has done nothing explicitly wrong. It’s a chilling moment in an otherwise comedic story.”

Eisenberg has a few things in common with Allen: both are writers, humourists – New Yorker contributors – and directors. He also shares some of Allen’s neurotic energy. They worked together on To Rome with Love (2012).

With Alec Baldwin in Woody Allen’s To Rome with Love

“It was nice to meet him and to be in the same room as him,” he says, sounding more like one of Allen’s fans than his cast members. “The most impressive thing about him, in my very limited experience of him, is just how easily directing comes to him. We would shoot a scene on which normally a director would do several different angles because they can edit the movie later. He [Allen] is able so deftly to figure out how most efficiently to shoot a scene and then, if something’s not working, immediately change it.”

Eisenberg expresses surprise at the turns his own film career has taken. “My background is in theatre. I feel like I understand that world a little better. Movies are mystifying. I don’t really know how they’re put together and why one thing becomes popular and the other thing no one sees. Theatre seems much clearer to me.”

His movie career is on the haphazard side; he’s never sure what’s coming next. By contrast, his life in the theatre is rigorously planned. His play The Revisionist, in which he co-starred with Vanessa Redgrave and which was a big hit off Broadway earlier this year, will soon be revived. He has another play for next year… and another for the year after. “I plan ahead with plays because I write them and it takes a long time to write.”

To the outside observer, Eisenberg’s workload, split between his writing and his film and theatre commitments, seems immense. Not so, he says. “Every actor I know has half the year off. The most successful work half the year – you have to do something else or you’d go crazy.”

With his performance as Mark Zuckerberg in mind, I ask about his attitude toward social media. “I have a negative opinion because I’m occasionally in the public eye,” he says of Twitter and Facebook. “Things like that terrify me because people write mean things. I don’t read them, but I suspect people write mean things. I want my privacy and that stuff doesn’t help. But it can be wonderful and creative. For somebody not in my situation, I’m sure it is wonderful. It can be used creatively like anything else – in the same way, I guess, that you can use an atomic bomb creatively…”


SOURCE

Jesse E

Interview with Jesse Eisenberg and cast of The Spoils


Thursday, 02 June, 2016

Jesse Eisenberg's new comedy The Spoils is currently running at the Trafalgar Studios, following a successful run off-Broadway. Described as "a cuttingly satirical glimpse of a lost soul searching to assent the...

Interview with Jesse Eisenberg and cast of The Spoils

Thursday, 02 June, 2016

Jesse Eisenberg's new comedy The Spoils is currently running at the Trafalgar Studios, following a successful run off-Broadway. Described as "a cuttingly satirical glimpse of a lost soul searching to assent the reality of his situation", this dark comedy speaks to the exasperated, self-analysing millennial generation.

The production stars Alfie Allen (Game of Thrones), Katie Brayben (Beautiful), Annapurna SriramJesse Eisenberg (The Social Network) and Kunal Nayyar (The Big Bang Theory), running for a strictly limited period to 13 August 2016.

We caught up with some of the lead cast mid-rehearsal for the production to find out more about the West End's latest comedy.

 

Jesse Eisenberg

DOH: Dom O'Hanlon
JE: Jesse Eisenberg

DOH: What inspired you to write The Spoils specifically as a piece for the stage rather than any other medium?

JE: I really do believe that theatre is the best medium for communicating substantive information to an audience. The audience, by virtue of it being live, is more engaged, they are interactive and they cannot look at their telephones or leave. For the stuff I like to write and this long form medium, then a play is the best form. The play is a comedy and it's accessible, there are familiar elements, but I'd also say that it discusses things that are more substantive, themes such as immigration, race, privilege, capitalism – stuff I'm interested in and stuff that in the theatre fits well.

DOH: Why do you think American actors are continually attracted to performing in the West End?

JE: I grew up in New York and in New York we not only think that it's the centre of the world but also the centre of theatre. The truth is that England, and Edinburgh, is the Mecca for theatre and that has to do with the history – Shakespeare obviously – great writers but I think also that the government funds theatre here which doesn't happen in New York so you have more opportunity to see plays done with lavish extravagant productions. In New York that wouldn't happen, plays that can be extravagant tend to be overly accessible and things that I'm not interested in, so in that way London is a real wonderful hub for theatre, and can in that way be attractive for actors who maybe have been doing the same thing for a while.

DOH: You're a big fan of British theatre I've read?

JE: I love the National Theatre, the downside of being here doing a play is that you don't get to see much else. It's quite distracting when you're in a play seeing other stuff, as you don't want to be reminded of the artifice of it. You want to be able to live in the world of the play and feel that its real and not be aware of what the audience is seeing because then I think when you're back on stage that night being in a play it can feel odd. So I think I'll wait until the play is over. I get distracted watching theatre when I'm working on a play or thinking about working on a play, because you really just see what's fake about it, not that the play is bad but that it's fiction and those people on stage are reciting lines, so it's hard to engage with a play when you're working on one and I love theatre – it's my life's work and a real thrill for me.

DOH: What does theatre mean to you?

JE: Theatre means a few different things to me. As an audience member it gives me the opportunity to engage in a way that's not passive unlike other forms of popular culture. As a writer and an actor it allows me to express myself that in a way feels interactive, immediate and spontaneous, and also dangerous – in an ultimately safe way. That live element is thrilling.


SOURCE

Zwillinge
记录每天的小幸福(2/100)...

记录每天的小幸福(2/100)



Day2



啊啊啊!今天太开心了!赶在上映的最后一天去看了僵尸之地2!快十年了,感觉卷西一点变化也没有,还是那么帅!



虽然我没看过第一部,但是我觉得还挺好看的,笑点也很多。特别是有一对很像woody和卷西的搭档出现的时候,天啊,真的有点像马总,有点真假马总的感觉



快落的一天

记录每天的小幸福(2/100)




Day2




啊啊啊!今天太开心了!赶在上映的最后一天去看了僵尸之地2!快十年了,感觉卷西一点变化也没有,还是那么帅!




虽然我没看过第一部,但是我觉得还挺好看的,笑点也很多。特别是有一对很像woody和卷西的搭档出现的时候,天啊,真的有点像马总,有点真假马总的感觉




快落的一天

Zwillinge

给最好的他们❤



9102年了,我居然刚上船

给最好的他们❤




9102年了,我居然刚上船

Jesse E

Creativity and Anxiety: How Great Minds Think Unalike

Oct 01,2019

by WILL MANSON


Continuing the discussion on creativity and anxiety, as part of the seminar series ‘Great Minds Think Unalike’ at Advertising Week NYC 2019 was this year’s guest, Oscar nominated actor and writer Jesse Eisenberg. Jesse...

Creativity and Anxiety: How Great Minds Think Unalike

Oct 01,2019

by WILL MANSON



Continuing the discussion on creativity and anxiety, as part of the seminar series ‘Great Minds Think Unalike’ at Advertising Week NYC 2019 was this year’s guest, Oscar nominated actor and writer Jesse Eisenberg. Jesse was interviewed by Harold Koplewicz, President of The Child Mind Institute, a non-profit organization focused on bringing awareness to child mental health issues and providing families with resources for treatment.
Today, 1 in 5 children and teens struggle with a mental health disorder, of which anxiety is the most common (Child Mind Institute, 2019). Harold lead a powerful interview with Jesse which discussed what it is like to suffer from anxiety as both a child and adult, the connection between anxiety and creativity, and the de-stigmatization of mental health issues.
When asked what he was like as a child, Jesse quickly responded, “I would describe myself as terrified and panicked”. Jesse suffered from what is commonly known as separation anxiety disorder. This mental health disorder causes a child to experience distress upon separation from their parent(s). Jesse recalls crying every day of first grade, which continued to a lesser extent throughout elementary school. Even weekends were extremely stressful for him because he knew he would have to go back to school on Monday and become separated once again. Jesse would pray for excuses, like being bullied, so that he could leave school and be reunited with his mother, but his prayers were unanswered.
Aside from this disorder his childhood was seemingly normal. After not knowing why he felt the way he did for all of elementary school, in 6th grade his parents brought him to a psychiatrist where he was diagnosed. Throughout middle school he began to act out and took some time off from school but gradually his anxiety got better as he learned to better manage it through creativity. Attending Public Professional High School in the city, and eventually The New School for college, allowed Jesse to surround himself with people he described as different from his typical peers. These were people who were more like him, who had their own difficulties and problems, and were also seeking creative outlets to express their feelings.
“Coming to New York was genuinely life saving”, described Jesse about these changes, despite the fact he lived a short distance away in the suburbs of New Jersey. Paradoxically, one would think that physically separating oneself further from the fixation of a parent would make anxiety worse but instead it did the opposite. The structure provided by traveling further to school and acting became two ways that Jesse was able to better manage his anxiety and stress. Acting for him was a “cathartic way to have an emotional experience that was safe and contextualized”. Creativity can act as an outlet for people who suffer from anxiety because it focuses the mind away from the matter that is stress inducing. Since acting is not a 9-5 job, Jesse keeps his mind constantly engaged by writing and traveling to places that he described as having some sort of utility, such as somewhere he can help people in need. It is when he is sitting around and having an experience that most people would find relaxing, like sitting on a beach, that he feels anxiety. The creative process and the stimulation of the mind it provides allow Jesse to attribute meaning to his life.
Jesse is incredibly humble perhaps because of his anxiety. The hedonistic aspects of partaking in things like parties or watching his own movie at a premiere he finds to be unbearable. In fact, he was hesitant to deliver this talk because it was primarily about himself and his experiences. However, the importance of forwarding the conversation about mental health and creating awareness outweighed the anxiety he felt, and ultimately helps de-stigmatize the subject. If even just one child is able to hear that he too, a celebrity, suffers from the same exact feelings that they are feeling than he is helping them to normalize their emotions. De-stigmatizing mental health issues and helping the many children who suffer can only be achieved by having discussions like these. Jesse Eisenberg is the perfect example of how great minds truly think unalike.


source

佐佑-Chalzea
感谢 @猫背蓝🌟 约的卷老师...

感谢 @猫背蓝🌟 约的卷老师!

【水印都打到脸上了应该不会有人用8

感谢 @猫背蓝🌟 约的卷老师!

【水印都打到脸上了应该不会有人用8

啊柴咕咕咕

Hearts Don't Break Around Here【Jesse × 你】

纯粹自娱自乐

 


寒冷的深秋清晨,浅薄雾气在玻璃窗上凝结。他从被窝里伸出手,小心翼翼绕过你关掉了床头的闹钟,一点暖意从被子里溜出去。他凑过来冲着你脖颈处说了一句我爱你。


你迷迷糊糊睁开眼,瞟见他耳根一点泛红,有点好笑和诧异:“你一般不是说早安吗?”


他长长哦了一声,“今天不是你生日吗。”


你说过不喜欢过生日,不喜欢感受到时间在流逝,那可没什么值得快乐的。


“我也爱你。”感谢他善解人意没有说出什么生日快乐之类的话,你钻进他怀里吻了他。柔软的唇有点凉凉的,像结在窗上的白霜。他从枕头下面摸出一本书,是前几日一直被他翻个不停的《荒原与爱情》。趁他看书没注意,你拿他...

纯粹自娱自乐

 


寒冷的深秋清晨,浅薄雾气在玻璃窗上凝结。他从被窝里伸出手,小心翼翼绕过你关掉了床头的闹钟,一点暖意从被子里溜出去。他凑过来冲着你脖颈处说了一句我爱你。


你迷迷糊糊睁开眼,瞟见他耳根一点泛红,有点好笑和诧异:“你一般不是说早安吗?”


他长长哦了一声,“今天不是你生日吗。”


你说过不喜欢过生日,不喜欢感受到时间在流逝,那可没什么值得快乐的。


“我也爱你。”感谢他善解人意没有说出什么生日快乐之类的话,你钻进他怀里吻了他。柔软的唇有点凉凉的,像结在窗上的白霜。他从枕头下面摸出一本书,是前几日一直被他翻个不停的《荒原与爱情》。趁他看书没注意,你拿他做了模特,试图描绘出卷发青年坐在温柔阳光下读书的一影——最初被他发现后,因为害羞他是不大愿意被你这么又盯又画的,你只好再三向他保证成品绝对只有你们两个观众,外加你们的猫。


看着他翻动书页,你问:“你很喜欢这本书?”


他嗯了一声,“比起作家,我觉得卡尔费尔德更像一个艺术家。或者说,他把自己看作一个艺术家。”


“而你把自己看作沉思者?”


他眨了眨眼,“不如说是个反思者?”


“好吧。”你笑,“那副画我快画好了——就是你看这本书的那幅。”


“好,”他点点头,嘴角微微向上扬,“我丝毫不怀疑你的画技,哪怕我这个模特并不像美术学院里的塑像那样俊美。”


你嘻嘻笑了一下,对他习惯性的自我嘲弄不置一词。他又翻了几页,从里面抽出两页纸,“嗯……这个故事的草稿,你想做它的第一读者吗?”


“当然。”你接过手中,读了起来。


迷茫彷徨的少女心中怀着难以解答的疑问,她问树木落下的最后一片枯叶,问融化在手中的雪花,问随风消逝的游魂,都无法的得到答案。于是她前往无人之境的深海,沉溺邃洋之中时遇见了一头孤鲸。几乎是一瞬间,她看到他眼睛的刹那就爱上了他,爱他孤独脆弱,仿佛自己,爱他看自己时的敏感温柔,足以慰藉伤痛。


他答出了少女的问题——为何时间难留,人生长苦,为何爱别人远比爱自己容易?


 


你叹了口气,笑起来。


你曾问过Jesse这两个的问题,也曾说过你爱他一见如故的脆弱,爱他敏感并理解世间一切的痛苦。“原谅我擅自把它写成了一个故事。”他说,有点忐忑地看着你


“不,谢谢你的礼物。”你抬眼对上他的视线。


“只要你不觉得我写得太童话太幼稚就好。”他挠了挠头,卷发松软地贴着额头。他靠近,极轻地吻了你,鼻音发出一声小小的笑。


 


You're the only answer to my painful life.


TequillaMo

赞美 @淮南以北 宝贝的手幅!!


携马总蹭个热度x

赞美 @淮南以北 宝贝的手幅!!


携马总蹭个热度x

开开鸭

【剧透】《丧尸乐园2#Zombieland2# 》观后感

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整体评价:作为一部丧尸题材的喜剧电影,片中有丧尸、有打丧尸、有丧尸血浆(不太多)、有笑点(笑点不多不少刚刚好,不尴尬)、有“大场面”(依然是当年小成本路线哦),并不是粗制滥造的续作,在当年这样的故事背景下,能开发出这样的第二部已经非常成功了,所以我给好评~


关于演员:我是主要是冲着卷西去看的,而且卷西和偷米同框,对我来说简直是次元墙爆裂。先讲卷西,10年过去他基本冻龄,各种小动作微表情无不透露着可爱,他出现的每一个画面都让我忍不住有“看到可爱小动物”时心情🥺但撇开卷西...

【剧透】《丧尸乐园2#Zombieland2# 》观后感

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整体评价:作为一部丧尸题材的喜剧电影,片中有丧尸、有打丧尸、有丧尸血浆(不太多)、有笑点(笑点不多不少刚刚好,不尴尬)、有“大场面”(依然是当年小成本路线哦),并不是粗制滥造的续作,在当年这样的故事背景下,能开发出这样的第二部已经非常成功了,所以我给好评~


关于演员:我是主要是冲着卷西去看的,而且卷西和偷米同框,对我来说简直是次元墙爆裂。先讲卷西,10年过去他基本冻龄,各种小动作微表情无不透露着可爱,他出现的每一个画面都让我忍不住有“看到可爱小动物”时心情🥺但撇开卷西粉的属性,这部剧的卡司阵容对于整部电影制作来说,就有一点点大材小用啦。(大家表现都很出色)偷米虽然出现的时间不太长,但个人觉得那段是本剧的最大笑点!


关于剧情:并没有什么终极丧尸大boss,也没有什么煽情的死人牺牲情节,完全轻松无负担,看电影的时候笑就好了。剧情走向很简单,4人在丧尸世界呆了10年,在白宫安了家,但Abigail饰演的LittleRock长大到了青春叛逆期,想去外面的世界认识更多的人。卷西饰演的Columbus向石头姐饰演的Wichita求婚,Wichita吓到了并合LittleRock再次跑路了。然后LittleRock又扔下姐姐跟别人跑路了,于是Wichita和Columbus和伍迪饰演的Tallahassee三人踏上寻妹之路。


关于彩蛋:第一部里被Columbus意外射杀的Bill Murray这部戏也有继续客串哦。而且电影最后的彩蛋还Cue了一下“加菲”但并不关jewnicorn幽灵船什么事😂

爬来爬去
当我看着emma和jesse演...

当我看着emma和jesse演情侣时,我满脑子都是andrew。当emma亲吻jesse时我会想andrew她也是这样亲吻加菲的吗,加菲会是什么样的反应呢?这种感觉简直太太太奇怪了。几年前我看zombieland 1的时候就觉得好奇妙,电影圈好小。谁能想到眼下一起演情侣的两个人在不久的将来会分别和一个叫andrew garfield的男演员上演一段爱恨情仇。而我当时压根没想到这样一部貌似非主流的电影还会有续集。毕竟,他们三个都已经是奥斯卡级别的演员了。


十年前他们谁都不认识加菲,在分别和加菲有过密切交往后,十年后加菲还是没有出现在他们俩任何一人的生活中。I mean, 如果石头姐没有和加...

当我看着emma和jesse演情侣时,我满脑子都是andrew。当emma亲吻jesse时我会想andrew她也是这样亲吻加菲的吗,加菲会是什么样的反应呢?这种感觉简直太太太奇怪了。几年前我看zombieland 1的时候就觉得好奇妙,电影圈好小。谁能想到眼下一起演情侣的两个人在不久的将来会分别和一个叫andrew garfield的男演员上演一段爱恨情仇。而我当时压根没想到这样一部貌似非主流的电影还会有续集。毕竟,他们三个都已经是奥斯卡级别的演员了。


十年前他们谁都不认识加菲,在分别和加菲有过密切交往后,十年后加菲还是没有出现在他们俩任何一人的生活中。I mean, 如果石头姐没有和加菲分手的话,本可以产生些关于这段三角友谊的有趣对话。但偏偏是如今这样一种尴尬的状态,也因此显出一种古怪的美感。

卷毛专属小仓库

【翻译】Reddit在线问答

主博转载地址

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(问答只截取了杰西相关的部分,文末有问答原链接。欢迎捉虫。)

(回答的id后面标注RF为导演的回复)

MojaveWalker:在拍摄《自卫的艺术》时你的感受是怎么样的?更具体一点的话和Alessandro Nivola一起搭戏感觉如何?那部电影真的很棒,你和Nivola在大荧幕上的化学反应很大程度上让这部电影变得如此完美。

zombielandmovie:那部电影是我喜爱参演的项目之一,Alessandro特别风趣,所以在拍摄时他不需要去刻意演出这些笑点,他可以一直这么搞笑。谢谢你观看了那部电影...

主博转载地址

==================================


(问答只截取了杰西相关的部分,文末有问答原链接。欢迎捉虫。)

(回答的id后面标注RF为导演的回复)

MojaveWalker:在拍摄《自卫的艺术》时你的感受是怎么样的?更具体一点的话和Alessandro Nivola一起搭戏感觉如何?那部电影真的很棒,你和Nivola在大荧幕上的化学反应很大程度上让这部电影变得如此完美。

zombielandmovie:那部电影是我喜爱参演的项目之一,Alessandro特别风趣,所以在拍摄时他不需要去刻意演出这些笑点,他可以一直这么搞笑。谢谢你观看了那部电影。

 

riegspsych325:Jesse,我只想说《冒险乐园》是我个人最喜爱的电影之一,我希望能看到你和Kristen Stewart再次合作!到目前为止你有感兴趣但尚未接触过的某一类型的角色吗?

zombielandmovie:我们一起还拍过另两部电影《美式极端》和《咖啡公社》,她还拍过《霹雳娇娃》但我无缘出演片中另两位“娇娃”的角色。

 

MoodyEncounter:我一直在这个帖子里狂发问题对此我感到35%的抱歉,但我只想说我在樱桃巷剧院看过Jesse的话剧《修正主义者》,真的太棒了。你还会继续演话剧吗?我看到Woody那天晚上也来看话剧了,我真的太好奇了所以我问了有关僵尸乐园续集的事情,我很开心看到他一直支持着你。

zombielandmovie:哇!谢了。我刚完成了一部话剧叫《愉快的对话》,主演是Susan Sarandon。接下来我还有部新的剧会在Audible这个平台上推出,谢谢你去看了那部话剧。

 

TinyEyedCrimsonChin:Woody Harrelson有聊过电影《堡垒》吗?

zombielandmovie:你为什么这么问?我觉得他有吧,这个电影也很不错,由非常有才华的Oren Moverman执导。

 

nocleverusername190:差不多隔了10年再重聚在一起拍电影是什么感觉?

zombielandmovie:刚开始有点点不真实,但当我们正式拍摄的时候我们都感觉好像时间从未消逝过一样。

 

Niyazali_Haneef:2029年我们能期待一下《僵尸之地3》吗?

zombielandmovie:没问题而且一天也不会提早。

zombielandmovie:RF:我们正预计这样!

 

 

btm29:Jesse,能告诉我那杯奶奶的蜜桃茶里实际上放了什么嘛?谢了,兄弟。

zombielandmovie:啊,其实我也不知道。你是想说茶底嘛?我猜可能就是冰茶吧。

 

 

Edwardistheman: 为什么隔了这么长时间才有第二部?

zombielandmovie:嗨edward,这里是jesseistheman(对应提问人的id)老实说我们都在等一个对的故事和剧本,我们本可以早点拍出第二部的但总觉得那不该是对的剧情,而且我们都对现在拍的这部很满意。

 

 

SirCakez:自从我看完第一部之后就一直困扰我的一个问题:真的存在一个完整的僵尸之地生存守则嘛?

zombielandmovie:我在网上找到过一个是别人补充完整的。我们这边的话是没有完整的生存守则的。但你可以在这部新电影中找到新的“戒律守则”。

 

 

GioMike:Jesse!我们需要做饭了!

Zombielandmovie:好的

 

 

Tarcion:大家好!谢谢你们开了这个问答环节!众所周知喜剧要拍续集的话都会多少有点挫折,特别是中间还隔了这么长时间。你们在准备续集的时候如何避免一些续集里惯有的毛病?比如说重提旧梗,或者是几乎一样的剧情,又或是让角色设定倾向于粉丝喜好而缺乏立体感?

zombielandmovie:嗨Tarcion,谈论续集时这也是我们关注的重点。实际上添加新角色肯定是有作用的,但归根结底这些角色在这个僵尸横行的世界里就允许了我们有很多的可能性。

 

heyitskelsey:嗨!这是给Jesse的提问因为我真的太好奇了!你认为Lex Luthor在空闲的时间不对超人说教的话他会做些什么?

zombielandmovie:打篮球。

 

 

Zorklis:Jesse,《社交网络》有拍续集的计划嘛?

zombielandmovie:据我所知还没有。

 

Niyazali_Haneef:嘿Jesse,你不会老的嘛?

zombielandmovie:只有内在变老。

 

 

Negan1995:嗨大家好啊!谢谢你们抽时间来参加这个问答活动。那我就直接开问了:你最喜欢的僵尸之地生存法则是什么?

zombielandmovie:我喜欢“有氧运动”(cardio)因为这一条在僵尸之地以外也适用。

 

 

fucken_name:Jesse,很久以前我听说你是WEEN的粉丝,你最喜欢他们的哪张专辑?

zombielandmovie:chocolate and cheese(试听链接)还有mollusk (试听链接

 

chrisl182:Jesse,如果你不做演员的话你会选择做什么?另外你能用Lex Luthor的语气录一条语音给我吗?

zombielandmovie:我的父母,妻子和朋友都是老师所以我也许会和他们一样。我觉得我应该录不了语音因为reddit发不了语音,但我相信你可以通过电影拼接出一些句子!

 

WonderWoman1984:Emma Stone在拍摄的时候怎么样?

zombielandmovie: 她超级幽默还很贴心又慷慨大方。

 

b-napp:你们好啊,我们会在电影里看到更多还是更少的夹心小蛋糕?在第一部里小蛋糕真的抢尽眼球!

zombielandmovie:RF: 电影里有个小蛋糕的彩蛋,你要仔细留意了。

Zombielandmovie:小蛋糕的戏份少了但多了其他的东西,别担心,电影里总会有点东西的。

 

 

 

SenorPenguin:@Jesse:为什么《夜色行动》是部超棒的电影?

zombielandmovie:因为里面有船。

 

 

MyWriterSide:Jesse,我喜欢你在《查理班克斯的教育》里的角色,我也一样初入大学校园,所以我特别喜欢这部电影,我也很喜欢你演绎这个角色的方式。你在拍摄这部电影时有什么难忘的回忆吗?

Zombielandmovie:我记得这部电影即使在拍摄过程中都很让人怀念,有点苦乐参半的感觉但我还挺喜欢的。

 

you-dontknowme:Jesse!《吃鲷鱼让我打嗝》是我最喜爱的小说之一!你接下来会有计划写新书吗?

zombielandmovie:嗨,谢谢你。接下来我会在Audible发行一本新书,所以如果你喜欢我的作品也不讨厌我的声音的话,你会喜欢这本新书的。谢谢你告诉我这些。

 

 

notchuck11:给Jesse或Ruben的问题,你喜欢的动画片是?

zombielandmovie:我喜欢《评论家》,你看过这部吗?我以前还用DVD机把它录下来。



(注:The Critic ,1994年至2001年播出的动画) 


Edwardistheman:电影里你个人喜欢的片段是?

zombielandmovie:有一段很棒的片段是讲述我们遇到了自己的“二重身”,Thomas Middleditch是一位出色的喜剧表演者和即兴演出者。

 

sitonacast:第一部里有个场景是Columbus提到了社交媒体(特别是facebook),这一点是因为Jesse演了《社交网络》所以特别加进去的吗?(他当时拍第一部的时候正好也接到了tsn的邀约?)还是说仅是巧合?

zombielandmovie:我觉得这个是个巧合,我猜它只是想说明社交媒体无处不在。

 

spideyismywingman:嗨Jesse!前几天我在电影节错过了你的新电影《生态箱》,到现在都还是很郁闷因为看起来很棒!这部值得去看吗?

zombielandmovie:是的,这部电影也很有趣而且很紧张刺激,我希望你会喜欢。我觉得明年春天就会上映了,谢谢你告诉提起这点。

 

Jesse E

Exclusive Interview: Jesse Eisenberg Talks The Art of Self-Defense (Blu-ray and DVD Release) and Zombieland: Double Tap

By Karen Benardello

Published on October 21, 2019


The need for Hollywood to reflect on the vital issues that are informing the evolution of present-day society is as important...

Exclusive Interview: Jesse Eisenberg Talks The Art of Self-Defense (Blu-ray and DVD Release) and Zombieland: Double Tap

By Karen Benardello

Published on October 21, 2019



The need for Hollywood to reflect on the vital issues that are informing the evolution of present-day society is as important as ever. That urgency of exploring the media, and overall modern culture’s, obligations to confront such important matters as toxic masculinity; sexism, both in and out of the workplace; and how guns and violence are viewed in America is analyzed in the dark comedy, ‘The Art of Self-Defense.’ The film, which was written and directed by Riley Stearns, crafts a very subtle commentary on those hot-button issues through the use of brilliant dark humor.

The movie was released On Demand, digital, Blu-ray and DVD earlier this month by Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, after it was distributed in theaters in July, courtesy of Bleecker Street. The Blu-ray and DVD discs includes the special features, ‘An Important Message from Sensei,’ and cast and crew interviews

‘The Art of Self-Defense’ follows timid bookkeeper Casey (Jesse Eisenberg) after he’s attacked on the street one night by a roving motorcycle gang. After being released from the hospital, he joins a neighborhood karate studio to learn how to protect himself. Under the watchful eye of a charismatic instructor, Sensei (Alessandro Nivola), and hardcore brown belt Anna (Imogen Poots), Casey gains a newfound sense of confidence for the first time in his life. But when he attends Sensei’s mysterious night classes, he discovers a sinister world of fraternity, brutality and hyper-masculinity, which presents a journey that places him squarely in the sights of his enigmatic new mentor.

Eisenberg generously took the time to sit down for an exclusive interview in New York City to talk about starring in both ‘The Art of Self-Defense’ and ‘Zombieland: Double Tap.’ The later horror comedy, which was directed by Ruben Fleischer, who also helmed the hit original 2009 film, ‘Zombieland,’ is now playing in theaters, courtesy of Columbia Pictures.

The conversation with the Academy Award-nominated actor began with him explaining why he was drawn to play Casey in ‘The Art of Self-Defense.’ He disclosed that he “read the script about two years ago, and I thought it was absolutely brilliant. The dialogue is so funny, as are the individual scenes, and the comic situations are fresh. But underneath all of that funny stuff, there was also some commentary on the ideas about masculinity, violence and sexism, which I thought were really valuable.” He also felt that commentary was “presented in such a sly, subtle way that it wouldn’t undermine what was really funny about the movie.”

Casey isn’t the typical nervous male protagonist throughout ‘The Art of Self-Defense.’ Like Eisenberg mentioned, the story becomes very surreal, and features wry commentary on the absurdities of masculinity. The performer then delved into what the appeal of subverting that trope was, as well as showing that Casey could become an aggressive person, throughout shooting the film.

“The movie takes place in this stylized world, where everything is heightened. So my character’s shyness isn’t what we think of as being shy; it’s almost a physical inability to speak to another person,” the actor divulged. “It’s this heightened manifestation of shyness, where the character can’t even speak to a colleague, because he’s so timid.

“When the character becomes more violent and masculine, it’s also a heightened version of that. The character’s not just standing up for himself to his boss; he also punches him in the throat,” Eisenberg shared. “So he experiences both experiences to the extremes; he starts off almost like a baby, and then becomes an aggressive guy.”

The performer then expressed his appreciation over being able to work with Stearns as the writer-director of ‘The Art of Self-Defense.’ “Riley’s an unusually earnest person. When you have a conversation with him, he doesn’t seem to have an ulterior motive. He’s also very sweet and friendly…So I was able to understand where these characters were coming from,” he revealed.

“My character is a sweet, innocent, child-like man who’s afraid of everything. He’s shocked that he’s attacked on the street, and (doesn’t understand) why anyone would do this to him,” Eisenberg admitted. “He’s such a good person himself, he can’t imagine that anyone would be anything other than a nice, good person.”

Following up on the dialogue that Stearns created for the dark comedy, the Golden Globe Award-nominated actor confessed that the words “were so funny to read silently to myself that I almost didn’t want to read it out loud…I felt that once I started reading the dialogue, it would lose its value, because it was so perfectly written. So I wanted to read, and speak, it as earnestly as possible, so that it wouldn’t lose anything.” Eisenberg added that Casey says “exactly what he thinks; he’s blunt, but not aggressive.”

When he started practicing the dialogue with Stearns, the performer “kept asking him, ‘Are you sure I’m saying this in the right way? The character’s manner of speech is so strange,'” the performer noted. “He talks like a baby, yet he’s a 36-year-old adult…So I kept asking Riley to guide me, since it’s such stylized dialogue. Once the other actors started working on the movie, I realized that what I was doing was right, because we were all part of the same stylized world.”

Further speaking about the rest of the cast, Eisenberg then revealed what it was like working with them, particularly Nivola and Poots. “I took about three weeks of karate with Imogen; sometimes we were in the same class, and sometimes we were in different classes. She became really good at it; since her character’s a brown belt, the expectations for her were a little bit higher than mine, because my character’s a yellow belt.

“Alessandro then came in about a day before he started shooting, which was a week into our filming schedule. Even though he’s the co-lead character in the movie, he didn’t have any time to rehearse. He was immediately very good,” Eisenberg also disclosed.

While ‘The Art of Self-Defense’ is a black comedy, it also contends with the serious subject of the lengths people take in order to protect themselves during, and after, a serious, life-changing incident. It takes familiar story lines of self-actualization through athletics and satirizes it, without any kind of condescension or being sarcastic. The performer then explains what the process of balancing the humor with the somber effects that the attack has on Casey was like.

“Well, unlike a movie like ‘Zombieland (: Double Tap),’ where you have to tone down some of the comedy in some of the sincere scenes, (‘The Art of Self-Defense’) didn’t require that, because the characters are never really being funny. The characters in (‘The Art of Self-Defense’) aren’t funny people, whereas the characters in ‘Zombieland’ are funny, and actively make jokes,” Eisenberg pointed out.

“While what the characters are saying in ‘The Art of Self-Defense’ is funny to an audience, they’re not meant to be funny; if anything, they’re trying to be incredibly sincere,” the actor explained. “So there never had to be a distinction between what was funny and dramatic; there are certain times when the audience are laughing at the characters, while at other times, they’re not.”

Eisenberg also expressed his relief that Casey’s only a yellow belt throughout the dark comedy, as he then began discussing what the process was like of crafting the physicality for his protagonist. “On every project, you always have to learn some new skill that the character knows how to do and you don’t, whether it’s stunts for this film, or magic for the movies I did about magicians,” he said, referencing his 2013 mystery thriller, ‘Now You See Me,’ and its 2016 action adventure sequel, ‘Now You See Me 2.’

“But in this movie, my character’s kind of a novice at karate, so I didn’t have to become great. But I had to look good enough to look as though I was there for six weeks. So I did the three weeks of intensive training. I probably became good enough in real life to actually become a yellow belt, in terms of the things I had to memorize, and the physicality I had to achieve.”

The performer added that people of all cultures, and not just Americans, seem to appreciate the dark comedy, because “it’s so unusual, and therefore is personal. Also, you’ll find whatever’s on your mind in the movie, because it presents a lot of themes in subtle ways,” he shared.

“When I read the script, I thought it was the funniest one I’ve ever read. But when we were making the movie, the Me Too Movement was starting, so I began thinking about masculinity, abuse and violence,” Eisenberg admitted. “So people can really bring their own perspective to this film.”


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